Personal Finance

Maximising returns can harm financial health

Trying to maximise returns can be injurious to your financial health. Harsh’s article in Business Standard today uses cricket analogy on why the decision-making process (even if the outcome is not the highest) is more important than just a successful outcome. When our ancestors lived in the jungles the outcome of one mistake meant instant death. Hence the need to always be right is baked into our evolutionary consciousness. But in investing you don’t need to be always right. Being mostly right is sufficient. “I would want this batsman to be in the team” said one of the selectors cited in the article. “Only if I was the captain of the opposite side” he went on to add. 😊 . He enjoys receiving your comments and suggestions and will respond to queries as quickly as he can.

Landmark reforms: Costs for some, benefits for all

The 100% made in India Account Aggregator framework once active will transform India by giving the citizen power over her own data and allowing digitisation and speedy reforms. But like the credit bureau reforms it may take a long time in having an impact because existing players will see costs and benefits will be for everyone. India cannot wait for a decade and in Harsh’s article in business standard he write about how the financial sector regulators need to set a firm date for IPs to comply. India needs to hasten the slow pace of furious change. Your comments are welcome.

Limit Section 54 benefit to curb money laundering

Why the price of your flat is so high? The demand from ” Investors” with black money keeps the flat prices high for genuine users. The exemption for long term capital gains under section 54 encourages such money laundering activities. Harsh’s article in Business standard today suggesting how the government can limit the exemption so as to prevent money laundering and at the same time not impact the genuine buyers who may be upgrading their flats. This tax loophole should be closed to bring down the cost of flats for genuine buyers. Your comments are most welcome

Assess your advisor on long-term performance

As an advisory firm we get asked by prospective clients about the indicative returns that they can expect. In this article in business standard, using cricketing analogy, Harsh explore why that is such a counter productive question. The headline is a little misleading. Assess your advisor by how comfortable you feel on your journey towards achieving your financial goals – not by how much returns have been achieved. There is no use achieving high returns if your goals are not achieved. Comments welcome

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